BACK TO PCSTATS Follow PCSTATS on Facebook PCSTATS RSS Feed PCSTATS Twitter Feed + Motherboards
+ Videocards
+ Memory
+ Beginners Guides
News & Advanced Search  Feedback?
[X]   Directory of
Guides & Reviews
The PCstats Forums

Beginners Guides
Weekly Newsletter
Archived Newsletters


Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU

SanDisk Launches 32-Gigabyte Solid State Drive - PCstats.com SanDisk Launches 32-Gigabyte Solid State Drive
Fri, March 30 2007 | 4:10PM | PermaLink Feedback?

PCSTATS.comSanDisk today introduced a 32-gigabyte (GB)*, 1.8-inch solid state drive (SSD) as a drop-in replacement for the standard mechanical hard disk drive. Initially aimed at enterprise users as the first step toward mass consumer adoption, SanDisk SSD offers field-proven durability to keep mobile PCs working in the toughest of conditions and improves the overall user experience.

Previously, large capacity flash-based drives had been used primarily by the military, aerospace and telecom industries, which demanded high performance and reliability under challenging environmental conditions. But now the declining cost of NAND flash memory has made SSD a viable and economically attractive alternative to existing technologies in a wider variety of applications, including mobile PCs aimed at enterprise and consumer users.

It is projected that inclusion of the SanDisk 32GB SSD in a notebook PC could increase the end-user price by around $600 in the first half of 2007, he added. Using NAND flash enhanced by SanDisk’s patented TrueFFS® flash management technology, SanDisk SSD delivers two million hours mean time between failures (MTBF)[i]. With no moving parts, it does not need to spin into action or seek files in the way that conventional hard disk drives do. These characteristics, combined with SanDisk's advanced flash management technology, make it possible for SanDisk SSD to deliver excellent performance compared with hard disk drives and competing solid state drives.

The SanDisk SSD announced today achieves a sustained read rate of 62 megabytes (MB)[ii] per second and a random read rate of 7,000 inputs/outputs per second (IOPS) for a 512-byte transfer[iii] – more than 100 times faster than most hard disk drives. Taking advantage of this performance, a laptop PC equipped with SanDisk SSD can boot Microsoft Windows® Vista™ Enterprise in as little as 35 seconds [iv]. It also can achieve an average file access rate of 0.12 milliseconds, compared with 55 seconds and 19 milliseconds, respectively, for a laptop PC with a hard disk drive[v].

Another advantage of SanDisk SSD is its extremely low power consumption rate compared to the hard disk drive: 0.4 watt during active operation versus 1.0 watt [vi]. This is particularly important to extend the battery life for the benefit of enterprise road warriors. These results enable new operating systems, such as Microsoft® Vista™, to provide mobile PC users with a superior overall system experience.

Catch the rest of this press release right here.
FULL STORY @ Archived from PCSTATS
http://www.pcstats.com/releaseview.cfm?releaseID=1610
CURRENT Hard Drives News on PCSTATS


News Archives by Category
Audio / Sound Beginners Guides Benchmarks
Biometrics BIOS Business / Industry
Cases Chipset Computer / SFF PCs
Cooling / Heatsinks CPU / Processors Digital Cameras
Drivers Editorial Games
Gossip Hard Drives Hardware
Home Theatre Imaging Memory
Mobile Devices Monitors Motherboards
Mouse Pads MP3 Players Networking
Notebooks Operating System Optical Drives
Overclocking Peripherals Power Supply
Press Release Printers Servers
Site News Software Tips
Tradeshows / Events Video Cards Web News
   09 / 02 / 2014 | 4:21AM
Hardware Sections 


google
 
PCSTATS Network Features Information About Us Contact
FrostyTech
TransmetaZone
BeginnersPC
PCSTATS Newsletter
PCSTATS Forums
ShoppingList Assistance
Tech Glossary
Technology WebSite Listings
PermaLink News
Archived News
Submit News (Review RSS Feed)
Site Map
PCstats Wallpaper
About Us
Employment
Privacy Policy
Advertise on PCSTATS

How's Our Driving?
© Copyright 1999-2014 www.pcstats.com All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.