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Beginners Guides: Creating MP3 Music Files

Beginners Guides: Creating MP3 Music Files  - PCSTATS
Abstract: Quick and simple instructions on how to make MP3s out of your CDs, and make MP3s into audio CDs back again. Digitized audio is governed by bit-rate, or the amount of song data that is transferred per second to the device that is playing the song. A digital audio recording using the 'Redbook' audio CD standard uses 1.4 million bits of data per second. This is the amount of information necessary to play a virtually identical digitized version of the original analog music.
Filed under: Beginners Guides Published:  Author: 
External Mfg. Website: Beginners Guides Dec 31 2003   Mike Dowler  
Home > Reviews > Beginners Guides > Beginners Guides

Variable bit-rate

To set the bit-rate for dBpowerAMP audio CD input, select the tracks you wish to create MP3 files from as above, then right-click the 'rip' button to bring up the options window.

From here you can choose a bit-rate by using the slider.

Variable bit-rate

Most newer MP3 encoding software also offers the option to create VBR (Variable Bit-Rate) files. The idea of VBR is to increase the sound quality of a given file while keeping its size low. This is accomplished by varying the bit-rate used depending on how much is happening musically in any given portion of a song.

For example, if a song contains long periods of silence or simple, non-overlapping sounds, a lower bit-rate could safely be used in these sections, reducing file size without compromising audio quality. In portions of the song with more audio activity, a higher bit-rate is used to ensure that the detail of the sound is preserved.

Some older MP3 players may have issues with VBR encoded MP3 files. It's worth checking into this before you purchase.

Most programs that implement VBR include some form of quality setting. This generally indicates the baseline (lowest) bit-rate that the software will use to encode the song. It will raise this when necessary, meaning that VBR files will generally be larger than an equivalent MP3 encoded completely at that minimum rate.

DBpowerAMP Audio CD converter does not indicate which bit-rates are used in its VBR setting. It uses a simple quality vs. size slider. We have gotten good results with this, but experiment to find your preference.

Using VBR in dBpowerAMP Audio CD

Select the tracks you wish to create MP3 files from as above, then right-click the 'rip' button to bring up the options window. Now click 'advanced options.'

Select 'variable bit-rate' and set the desired quality. Hit 'ok' then 'convert' to create your file.

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Contents of Article: Beginners Guides
 Pg 1.  Beginners Guides: Creating MP3 Music Files
 Pg 2.  How to Create MP3 files from CD audio disks
 Pg 3.  Encoding level vs. sound quality
 Pg 4.  — Variable bit-rate
 Pg 5.  How to create audio CDs from mp3 files
 Pg 6.  Alternatives to MP3

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