PCSTATS Main Page Follow PCSTATS on Facebook PCSTATS RSS Feed PCSTATS Twitter Feed + Motherboards
+ Videocards
+ Memory
+ Beginners Guides
News & Advanced Search  Feedback?
[X]   Directory of
Guides & Reviews
The PCstats Forums

Beginners Guides
Weekly Newsletter
Archived Newsletters



Contact the Suite 66 Advertising Agency

Seagate Backup Plus Slim External USB 3.0 2TB Hard Drive Review
  More Seagate Reviews... and Hard Drives.
Kingston SSDNow V300 240GB SATA III SSD Review
 [>>]
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips for Windows
 [>>]
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips and Tweaks for Windows
 [>>]
Beginners Guide: Hi-Resolution Panoramic Images with MSFT ICE
 [>>]
More>>

Search...
Chipset RSS News Feed - PCSTATS
... 0 news stories awaiting approval  
Intels H67- und P67-Chipsatz - Performance Report
     Sun, Feb 06 2011 | 12:02P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Intels H67- und P67-Chipsatz - Performance Report
  FULL STORY @ REVIEWS

CyberPower Gamer Xtreme 5000 Intel P67 Sandy Bridge
     Sat, Feb 05 2011 | 9:02A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
“Finally Intel’s Sandy Bridge is here! I’m sure you have heard about it a lot in the past few months. This new CPU architecture is still built on the 32nm process and is still branded Core i3, i5 and i7 so what really is new? These new processors are supposed to be more efficient, have the best integrated graphics ever from Intel and they are to be priced quite competitively. This of course is not an Intel Sandy Bridge review, this is a CyberPower system review! They have really built an awesome Sandy Bridge system for us and we can’t wait to check it out! Read on to see what Sa ndy Bridge really can do and how awesome this system is!"
  FULL STORY @ THINKCOMPUTERS

Intel identifies chipset design error, implementing solution
     Thu, Feb 03 2011 | 3:17P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
As part of ongoing quality assurance, Intel has discovered a design issue in a recently released support chip, the Intel 6 series, codenamed Cougar Point, and has implemented a silicon fix. In some cases, the SATA ports within the chipsets may degrade over time, potentially impacting the performance or functionality of SATA-linked devices such as hard disk drives and DVD-drives. The chipset is utilized in PCs with Intel's latest second-generation Intel Core processors, codenamed Sandy Bridge. Intel has stopped shipments of the affected support chip from its factories. Intel has corrected the design issue, and has begun manufacturing a new version of the support chip, which will resolve the issue. The Sandy Bridge microprocessor is unaffected and no other products are affected by this issue.
  FULL STORY @ DIGITIMES

iXBT Labs Review: Intel 6th Series Chipset Defect
     Thu, Feb 03 2011 | 3:09P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
(NOTE - For the latest developments from every motherboard maker on this developing recall please see this PCSTATS article - Intel 6-Series Chipset Recall - Sandy Bridge Intel P67 & H67 

"Being reasonable and willing to help you, our readers, we searched for available information on the problem. Since many would like to hear from Intel itself, we contacted Mikhail Rybakov, Intel PR Manager Russia/C.I.S., over the phone and asked him a few questions. Here's what we've managed to find out."

So what's the problem? The leakage current turned out to be higher than planned for one of the transistors. This happened because the dielectric layer turned out to be too thin for the chosen voltage, or the voltage was too high for that chip design. It's not clear how the error was made. Anyway, such things happen much more often than we hear about them. But in this case Intel is unlucky, because the problematic transistor is in the clock generator circuit responsible for SATA-300 ports (of which there are 4). In certain conditions this may result in controller synchronization errors, which, in turn, will lead to read and write errors. This may reduce performance of drives at best, as data will be read/written several times until confirmation. Under the least favorable conditions, data may be corrupted. This is not a certainty, but a possibility.

This is not a logical error in die topology (like a corrupt interconnection or something), but a potential problem that may show over time as a result of wear. Serious errors are detected as soon as the first wafer is made, because chips are run through a number of logic tests. How does one find a less serious error? All manufacturers use more or less similar accelerated aging methods. The same batch of chips is exposed to high temperatures in a heat chamber as well as high voltages to simulate prolonged wear. There are rather strict mathematical models which allow engineers to predict mean time between failure (MTBF) based on statistical damage results obtained in aforementioned wear tests. That's exactly what we're dealing with today: a prediction from Intel (we'll discuss exact changes and time periods later). One has to understand that it's a statistical estimate, not a fact. There are simply no 3-year old machines based on the new chipsets at the moment to speak of actual defects.

Since data stored on computers often costs much more than computers themselves (unless it's a gaming rig), Intel made a tough decision not to wait for actual trouble. As the Murphy's law states, "Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong," so they had to look for a solution."

  FULL STORY @ IXBTLABS

Alert for Intel 6 Series Express Chipsets (P67 / H67)
     Tue, Feb 01 2011 | 2:58P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
(NOTE - For the latest developments from every motherboard maker on this developing recall please see this PCSTATS article - Intel 6-Series Chipset Recall - Sandy Bridge Intel P67 & H67 

Here is the latest on the continuing saga of the Intel P67 / Intel H67 Chipset recall....

"As part of ongoing quality assurance, Intel Corporation has discovered a design issue in a recently released support chip, the Intel® 6 Series (and the Intel® C200 Series Chipset), and has implemented a silicon fix. In some cases, the Serial-ATA (SATA) ports within the chipsets may degrade over time, potentially impacting the performance or functionality of SATA-linked devices such as hard disk drives and DVD-drives. The chipset is utilized in PCs with Intel’s latest Second Generation Intel Core processors. Intel has stopped shipment of the affected support chip from its factories. Intel has corrected the design issue, and has begun manufacturing a new version of the support chip which will resolve the issue. The Sandy Bridge microprocessor is unaffected and no other products are affected by this issue.

The company expects to begin delivering the updated version of the chipset to customers in late February and expects full volume recovery in April. Intel stands behind its products and is committed to product quality. For computer makers and other Intel customers that have bought potentially affected chipsets or systems, Intel will work with its OEM partners to accept the return of the affected chipsets, and plans to support modifications or replacements needed on motherboards or systems. The systems with the affected support chips have only been shipping since January 9th and the company believes that relatively few consumers are impacted by this issue. The only systems sold to an end customer potentially impacted are Second Generation Core i5 and Core i7 quad core based systems. Intel believes that consumers can continue to use their systems with confidence, while working with their computer manufacturer for a permanent solution.

If you believe you may be affected by this issue, please contact your place of purchase, or your Intel Field Sales Representative."

  FULL STORY @ INTEL.COM

Intel Recalls H67/P67 chipsets, tells users not to worry.
     Mon, Jan 31 2011 | 2:58P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
(NOTE - For the latest developments from every motherboard maker on this developing recall please see this PCSTATS article - Intel 6-Series Chipset Recall - Sandy Bridge Intel P67 & H67 

I just got off a conference call with Intel and it looks like they got a mess on their hands right now. Intel had a design oversight with one of the metal layers of their 6 series chipset, so they need a re-spin of the silicon to fix the issue. This issue is on all 'Cougar Town' 6 series chipsets and Intel said that slightly less than 8 million of these chipsets have already been made. All of those chipsets have Serial-ATA (SATA) ports within the chipsets that may degrade over time, potentially impacting the performance or functionality of SATA-linked devices such as hard disk drives and DVD-drives...
  FULL STORY @ LEGITREVIEWS

Intel halting shipment of 6-series chipsets
     Mon, Jan 31 2011 | 2:57P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
(NOTE - For the latest developments from every motherboard maker on this developing recall please see this PCSTATS article - Intel 6-Series Chipset Recall - Sandy Bridge Intel P67 & H67 

"Intel is telling us they have completely stopped shipping the affected chipset and already begun production of the revised and fixed version of the 6-series chipsets. But shipping of those chipsets won't start until late February and full "inventory replacement" won't happen until sometime in April. Intel has committed to working with partners to help facilitate the recall of affected products once production is in full swing, but this isn't something easy to do. You can't just replace a hard drive or memory module here - full motherboard replacement is going to be required on desktop and notebook platforms - a costly error indeed. The company has declared a $700M write off estimate for this cause."

"In some cases, the Serial-ATA (SATA) ports within the chipsets may degrade over time, potentially impacting the performance or functionality of SATA-linked devices such as hard disk drives and DVD-drives. "

"The error and source of degradation is in the silicon itself - not a driver or software or firmware error at all. In some cases Intel has seen silicon degradation in the section of the 6-series chipsets where SATA communication occurs. "

  FULL STORY @ PCPER

 
Intel's Linux Sandy Bridge Graphics Still Troubling
     Tue, Jan 25 2011 | 9:03A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"When Intel launched their newest "Sandy Bridge" processors earlier this month there were no Linux benchmark results available. We were not seeded with any CPU in advance and the other publications that have flings with Linux were unable to get the Linux graphics support working. There is no "out of the box" Sandy Bridge support under Linux with Ubuntu 10.10 and other distributions released in the past few months. It was not until the time that Sandy Bridge launched that there was the releases of Linux 2.6.37, Mesa 7.10, and the xf86-video-intel 2.14 DDX that are the versions reported to play well with the new Intel graphics. Because of the lack of "out of the box" Linux support, there was a very scathing review at SemiAccurate.com that went as far as calling Sandy Bridge the biggest disappointment of the year. The code was said to be ready, but there is a challenge in installing open-source GPU drivers by many Linux users."
  FULL STORY @ PHORONIX

Intel's SandyBridge II HD Gfx, Open GL and AVX Performance
     Tue, Jan 18 2011 | 12:27A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
I don’t recall which movie it was, something that was highly acclaimed and after watching it with a friend, he claimed that it sucked. It sucked for the simple reason that he had read and heard so much of be buzz around it that the real thing simply did not live up to his expectations. Something similar is happening now with respect to Sandy Bridge. The prelaunch expectations were that it would stomp everything by a land slide and now it only turns out to be about the fastest CPU ever released by Intel. And the rest of the world. How disappointing is that? Sarcasm aside Sandy Bridge has come and the initial impression has been rather overwhelming. Particularly with respect to the energy efficiency, there is not quite anything like SB out there. The same goes for the overclocking potential, yet, almost everybody complains about the lack of real life OC achievements. It’s a cruel world that Sandy was thrown into … On the downside, there are certain layers of hype that need to be peeled off, particularly with respect to Intel releasing what might be called an immature platform. OpenGL does not work, AVX functionality is crippled by the cache interconnect and possibly by the Uops cache and Integer AVX will not even be functional until 3 generations down the road. Ok, we can live with the latter, it appears rather inconsequential for the time being. The L2 connectivity is also something we can live with, 20-30% performance increase at the same power budget are very significant. And OpenGL has somehow outlived its usefulness.
  FULL STORY @ LOSTCIRCUITS

News: A quick look at chipset PCI Express performance
     Fri, Jan 14 2011 | 11:34A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Finally Intel has a mid-range chipset with proper PCIe 2.0 lanes. We test the P67`s PCIe implementation to see how it stacks up against the competition."
  FULL STORY @ TECHREPORT.COM

Intel likely to outsource Panther Point chipsets
     Mon, Jan 03 2011 | 11:10A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Intel plans to outsource the production of its Panther Point chipsets which will be paired with Ivy Bridge CPUs to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company (TSMC), according to industry sources. Intel is scheduled to launch the Ivy Bridge CPUs in the first quarter of 2012.
  FULL STORY @ DIGITIMES

In Win Griffin Computer Case Review
     Mon, Jan 03 2011 | 9:02A | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"In Win's Griffin chassis has a lot going for it. A budget case with good cooling (due in large part to the big side panel fan,) is always good to see and a real boon to the enthusiast with limited funds. With a distinctive look and nice features like a hidden I/O panel and tool-free drive clips, the Griffin delivers a lot of bang for the buck."
  FULL STORY @ TWEAKNEWS

SiS965 Provides PCI Express
     Mon, Jul 05 2004 | 1:06P | Chipset | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
SiS’ newest southbridge chipset, the SiS965, was designed with the latest market trends in mind, featuring support for next generation technologies that are redefining the PC industry. The SiS965 comes complete with support for PCI Express, which makes it ideal for connecting high-speed peripheral devices for multimedia applications, as well as a Gigabit Ethernet MAC. The SiS965 features a Gigabit Ethernet MAC built into the chip. With this architecture, not only are costs saved, but also 2 Gigabit Ethernet connections can be enabled from Gigabit Ethernet MAC and external PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet card, giving customers more flexibility. This feature gives customers more options in adopting the advantages of high-speed Ethernet connections. Gigabit Ethernet promises to revolutionize the world of data transmission. New multimedia applications that will benefit from Gigabit Ethernet include downloadable movie, television and music services which connect through the Internet, bypassing traditional methods of delivery. With the SiS965 Giga MAC, users and vendors alike will benefit enormously from the implementation of next-generation Ethernet technology in a cost effective and high performance chip architecture:
  FULL STORY @ SIS

Chipset NEWS PAGE: of 6    

Hardware Sections     07/24/2014 | 1:04PM  
Beginners Guides
PCSTATS RSS Feeds
RSS Newsletter
RSS News
Motherboards
Mouse Pads
Networking
Notebooks
Peripherals
Powersupply
Printers
Servers
Videocards
Editorials
Cases and Access.
CD-ROMs
Computers / SFF PCs
Cooling - Heatsinks
CPU / Processors
Digital Cameras
Hard Drives
Home Theatre
Memory
MP3 Players
Monitors
Technology Content    
Beginners Guide: Hi-Resolution Panoramic Images with MSFT ICE
Beginners Guide: Hi-Resolution Panoramic Images with MSFT ICE
Jan 27 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Samsung ATIV Book 9-Lite NP915S3G-K01 13.3-inch Touch Screen Notebook Review
Samsung ATIV Book 9-Lite NP915S3G-K01 13.3-inch Touch Screen Notebook Review
Dec 23 | Notebooks
Rating:  
Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
Nov 25 | Home Theatre
Rating:  
Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU
Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU
Nov 19 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
Nov 18 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Oct 02 | Beginners Guides
Rating:
A broken or cracked LCD screen makes a laptop utterly useless, good thing PCSTATS can show you how to replace that busted laptop screen with a minimum of fuss and for less money than a service center charges. PCSTATS will be fixing a cracked LCD screen on a Lenovo T530 ThinkPad notebook, the general procedures outlined here work for any notebook though.
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Jul 27 | Motherboards
Rating:
The Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 is an awesome 'Sandy Bridge-E' motherboard for anyone in the business of content creation, yet still nimble enough to take on multi-videocard gaming and overclocking at the end of a days work.
MORE » Complete PCSTATS Article and Review Listings...

The best Guides by the best writers on the internet; PCstats Beginners Guides explain computers, software, and all those other wonderful things that cause you frustration.

Learn how to use your computer better, master the internet while protecting yourself, and know what to do when your hard drive kicks the bucket.

  1. 10 Steps to a Secure PC
  2. 101 Tips and Tweaks for Windows XP
  3. 104 Killer Tech Tips for Windows XP
  4. 99 Performance Tips for Windows XP
  5. 99 Windows Vista Performance Tips
  6. Annual PC Checkup Checklist
  7. Assembling Your Own PC
  8. Back up and Restore Data in WinXP
  9. Browser Hijacking and How to Stop it
  10. Building a Home Theatre PC / HTPC
  11. Burning CDs and DVDs
  12. Cloning WindowsXP
  13. Converting Videotape Into Video Files
  14. Crash Recovery: The Blue Screen of Death
  15. Creating a Weblog / Blog
  16. Creating MP3 Music Files
  17. Decrypting Lost Document & Zipped File Passwords
  18. Diagnosing Bad Hard Drives
  19. Diagnosing Bad Memory
  20. Downgrading Windows Vista Back To Windows XP
  21. Dual OS Installation of WindowsXP 32-bit/64-bit
  22. Encryption and Online Privacy
  23. Ergonomics & Computers
  24. Flashing a Video Card BIOS
  25. Flash Memory Data Recovery and Protection
  26. Firewalls and Internet Security
  27. Firewall Setup and Configuration
  28. Forgotten Passwords & Recovery Methods
  29. Formatting and Partitioning a Hard Drive
  30. Fundamentals of Upgrading a PC
  31. Hard Drive Data Recovery
  32. Home Networking and File Sharing
  33. How to Install: Intel Socket 775 CPU and Heatsink
  34. How to Install: Intel Socket 1366 CPU and Heatsink
  35. How to Install: Intel Socket 1155 CPU and Heatsink
  36. How to Install: AMD Socket AM3 CPU and Heatsink
  37. How to Install: AMD Socket FM1 CPU and Heatsink
  38. How to Fix Homesite Design Mode to Work in WindowsXP/ Vista
  39. How To Make a Budget Desktop Computer on the Cheap
  40. How to Update a Motherboard BIOS
  41. Installing RAID on Desktop PCs
  42. Installing Windows Vista
  43. Installing Windows XP
  44. Internet Connection Sharing
  45. Legally Copying Software and Music
  46. Linux Part 1: Getting Familiar
  47. Linux Part 2: Installing a PC
  48. Linux Part 3: New Software
  49. Little Known Features of WindowsXP
  50. Making Old Software Compatible with Windows Vista
  51. Making DVD Movies from Video Files
  52. Most Common Ways to Kill a PC
  53. Optical Drives & Recording Formats
  54. Overclocking the CPU, Motherboard & Memory
  55. Overclocking the Videocard
  56. Preventing Data Theft from a Stolen Laptop
  57. Printer Sharing on a Home Network
  58. Quick Guide for Eliminating Spyware and Hijacker Software
  59. RAM, Memory and Upgrading
  60. Registry: Backups, Repairs, and Protection
  61. Remote Access to Computers
  62. RSS Feed Setup & Subscriptions
  63. Safe Mode in Windows Vista For Crash Recovery
  64. Setting up an FTP Server in WinXP
  65. Slipstreaming WindowsXP with Service Pack 2
  66. Spyware Protection and Removal
  67. Stopping Spam
  68. Stopping Vista From Thrashing Hard Disks to Death
  69. Synchronizing Files and Folders
  70. Unattended Windows 2000/XP Installations
  71. Understanding & Creating Batch Files
  72. Understanding & Tweaking WindowsXP Services
  73. Upgrading A Motherboard Without Reinstalling
  74. Upgrading Win98 to Windows XP
  75. USB Memory Drive Projects & Tips
  76. VPNs and Internet Connection Security
  77. Website Hosting From A Home PC
  78. Website Hosting With Apache
  79. Windows Vista Crash Recovery and Repair Install
  80. Windows XP Command Prompt
  81. Windows XP Safe Mode Explained
  82. Wireless Home Networking
  83. Wireless Network Security
"Get the 'Stats and Stay Informed!"


Frostytech's Top 5 Heatsink Comparison Charts

Recommended Tech Resources:
Tom's Guide Frostytech.

 
The PCstats Forums
 
PCstats Network Features Information About Us Contact
FrostyTech
TransmetaZone
BeginnersPC
PCSTATS Newsletter
PCSTATS Forums
ShoppingList Assistance
Tech Glossary
Technology WebSite Listings
PermaLink News
Archived News
Submit News (Review RSS Feed)
Site Map
PCSTATS Wallpaper
About Us
Employment
Privacy Policy
Advertise on PCSTATS

How's Our Driving?
© Copyright 1999-2014 www.pcstats.com All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.