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Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU
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Weekend Tweaking - Tips and Beginners Guides to Make your PC Run Faster!
     Fri, Apr 01 2011 | 6:20P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF

PC Crashed and you can't afford to take it to the repair shop? Save some time and money by using PCSTATS' extensive knowledge to put your PC back into top running condition! Dig into a pile of handy Beginners Guides, sweep the performance sucking dust bunnies out of that old computer for good, and get more out of the PC you already have!

Make your computer run better, run smarter, and maybe even faster! Starting from the top, PCSTATS has award winning Beginners Guides to 99 Windows Vista Performance Tips and Tweaks, and 99 Performance Tips for Windows XP!!  For your convenience, the Top 20 Beginners Guides are listed at the bottom.

Windows Vista users will appreciate PCSTATS's guides to making older software programs compatible with Vista, it's certainly a lot better than buying all new programs. Since Vista can be a little tough on PCs, we also discuss how to stop Windows Vista from thrashing hard drives to death. PCSTATS covers installing Windows Vista, and then it's naturally on to Vista crash recovery and repair installs. If Vista is acting up, you'll want to read our guide to safe mode in Windows Vista before taking your PC to a repair center.

PCSTATS covers installing Windows XP and upgrading from Windows 98 to XP. Once you've got XP installed, how about learning about some of its hidden features. Moving on, we tackle some of the most asked computer questions like "how do I create MP3 files from my CDs?", " how do I burn CDs/DVDs and what formats should I use?." We also put you on the right track towards converting your home movies into video files, then turning those video files into DVDs. Most important of all, how should you protect your data? We have some good answers, and more than a few helpful hints to put you on the right track.

A second area PCSTATS Beginners Guides focus on is how to make your computing life easier. For example, spam email has become a painful fact of life for most computer users, but it doesn't have to be such a major irritation. A beginner's guide to stopping spam gives you several easy procedures which will quickly make spam email much less of an obstacle to your use of email. Likewise, the proliferation of viruses and spyware on the Internet threatens everybody. We give you a heads up on computer safety in our guide to firewalls and Internet security , and cover the safe removal of intrusive adware and spyware programs too. Do your wrists and eyes ache from too much computer time? Check out PCSTATS' ergonomics guide for some handy tips towards more comfortable computing.

Increasing your productivity within Windows XP is also a topic covered in several of our guides. If you regularly work at home as well as the office, you'll be interested in our guide to synchronizing files and folders so you'll always have the latest versions of your files at hand with out confusion. Own one of those handy-dandy USB key drives? take a look at a set of cool and clever USB drive projects; you can do a lot more with those things than you might think! Another handy thing to learn is how to create batch files within Windows; these little programs allow you to automate many of your most tedious tasks.

Tired of installing the latest Service Packs in every new Windows XP system you create? Tired of installing Windows XP at all? Check out this pair of guides, both of which are among the most popular articles with overworked IT staff: 'Slipstreaming: creating a Windows XP CD with Service Pack 2 included' guides you through the process of incorporating the latest Windows XP Service Pack right into your operating system CD, while the guide to creating a fully unattended Windows XP installation CD gives you everything you need to know about automating the Windows installation process in one handy location.

If you'd like to be sure that you have the basics of security and computer hygiene nailed down, but don't have the time or the inclination to learn about these subjects, try our quick guides to securing your PC and getting rid of spyware, adware and browser hijackers.

If you want to know more about the guts of your system, the hardware that keeps it going, PCSTATS has a series of articles just the weekend hardware warrior. Take a look at our guide to assembling your own PC for a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to building a home computer. Once you have that mastered, you'll find the do-it-yourself guide to building a home theatre PC a snap! The annual PC maintenance checklist helps ensure that your PC will stay in top shape for as long as you own it. Sometimes it's good to go back to basics, and a good way to start is with this guide to computer memory. It explains how RAM works and why you might want more of it if your computer is getting 'slow'. For PC speed freaks, we cover RAID hard drive setups in detail, what they are, and how to set them up. If you are feeling ambitious, how about a bit of video card BIOS flashing?

Would you like to try overclocking but aren't sure where or how to start? This guide to overclocking a videocard will get you moving in the right direction. The companion guide to overclocking the processor, memory and motherboard explains the overclocking process for the rest of the system components; what the benefits are, as well as some of the potential dangers.

Interested in what makes Windows XP tick? Then we have some articles for you; this guide to the Windows XP registry will take you through this storehouse of XP customization settings, while the comprehensive article on Windows XP's Safe Mode will equip you to use this powerful recovery mode to your advantage. For Windows Vista users, see our guide to Safe Mode Crash Recovery in Vista. I'd also suggest you check out the guide to the Windows XP services for information on what these behind-the-scenes programs do, and how to create your own. If you are experiencing frustrating crashes or errors (and what Windows user hasn't at some point or another?) this handy guide to understanding and resolving the infamous BSOD (Blue Screen Of Death) error should be interesting reading. Finally, get to grips with the Windows XP command prompt to increase your knowledge and control of the OS.

Upgrading and updating your PC is another inevitable task that we try to make easier. Take a look at PCSTATS' guide to flashing your motherboard's BIOS for one example. If you've grown used to your Windows XP install and hate the thought of reinstalling to accommodate a new computer system or hard drive, see this time-saving guide to cloning windows XP for another solution... Want to upgrade your system but don't know where to begin? We have the answers in this guide to the fundamentals of updating a PC , and it will certainly give you a helping hand in the right direction. If all you want to do is upgrade your motherboard, we've got an article on handling this complex operation too. No more service charges!

If you are tired of Windows altogether, or wary of Microsoft's operating system validation requirement for downloading patches, why not consider moving to Linux? PCSTATS has written three guides to this alternative OS, covering the basics of getting familiar with the Linux KDE desktop and then moving into the process of installing a Linux PC. In the third installment, we walk you through the task of installing new software in Linux, and where to find some productive programs for free.

Networking is a very important area of computer knowledge, especially as many homes now have more than one computer. Sharing an Internet connection among the computers in your household is a good start. If you're curious, PCSTATS also has guides to home networking, allowing you to share files between the systems in your home, and an article on the benefits of wireless networking. While wireless is extremely easy to set up and use, it has some security concerns that every user should know about. In PCSTATS' wireless security article, we provide any user with the knowledge they need to secure their wireless network from intruders. Advanced users may find this guide to Virtual Private Networks (VPN) and internet connection security especially useful. If you have a printer, why not share it over your network so that anyone in your house can use it? The easy to follow printer sharing guide has the goods.

Once you have a broadband Internet connection, there are a lot of interesting things you can do with Windows XP that are not immediately obvious. For example, how about enabling remote access, so you can work on your desktop from any Internet enabled computer in the world? Or maybe you'd like to create your own FTP server, allowing easy file transfers over the Internet? Perhaps you'd even like to learn how to create your own weblog ('blog') a small personal website. Speaking of websites, this guide to website hosting from a home PC has that critical topic completely covered! It's all here in PCSTATS collection of Beginners Guides. Once you've got a blog or website going, how about setting up an RSS feed so others can track your site easily? If you check out several bookmarks every day, learning about RSS readers could save you a lot of time.

Hardware failure is an unfortunate fact of life for PC owners, and one of the things that keeps computer stores in business. Fortunately there are ways to detect problems before they happen, and reduce the damage if your hardware should fail. Hard drives are one of the focal areas for failure in modern computer systems, due to their mechanical nature. They are also rather easy to erase, accidentally or maliciously. In one of our most popular and acclaimed guides, PCSTATS Beginners Guides looks at ways to restore your lost data in the event of just such a hard drive disaster. On the same topic, our guides to diagnosing bad memory and bad hard drives as well as interpreting your computer's 'beep' error codes will help you troubleshoot your PC at home. If you'd just like to expand the amount of storage space on your PC, well we've covered that aspect too with the guide to formatting and partitioning a hard drive!

Encryption and passwords are important facets of modern computer use, especially where the Internet is concerned. These subjects can be rather hard to understand for the average user, however. We've attempted to set things straight in this walk-through of encryption and online privacy .

Locked yourself out of your computer or file by forgetting a password? In twin guides, PCSTATS' examines the strengths and weaknesses of Windows password security and document password decryption giving you the knowledge you need to reclaim access. Knowing how to break back into Windows, or a locked document or ZIP file isn't something you'll need to know everyday, but when you're in a bind this information can be a life saver. PCSTATS also examines how to 'harden' your laptop computer , so if it is lost or stolen, at least your data will be safe.

For assorted tips and tweaks that can make your Windows XP experience, cleaner, faster and uniquely yours, we present our most popular set of PCSTATS Guides; 101 tips and tweaks for Windows XP and 104 Great Tech Tips for Windows XP. That's 304 useful tips, every one of them tested. You are sure to find something you like in one of these articles.

For some comic relief, as well as a serious look into the kinds of problems and errors of judgement that may one day destroy your precious computer, take a look at the extremely insightful guide to the most common ways to kill a PC. Why not visit our feedback page and share your own stories once you're finished!?

Here are the TOP 20 PCSTATS Beginners Guides of all time... feel free to share this list on your blog or favorite forum.
Top 20 Beginners Guides
1. Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips for Windows XP

2. Beginners Guides: Setting up an FTP Server in Windows XP

3. Beginners Guides: 101 Tech Tips and Tweaks for Windows XP

4. Beginners Guides: Hard Drive Data Recovery

5. Beginners Guides: Cloning WindowsXP

6. How Motherboards Are Made: A Gigabyte Factory Tour

7. Beginners Guides: Crash Recovery & The Blue Screen of Death

8. Beginners Guides: Overclocking the CPU, Motherboard and Memory

9. Introduction to PCI Express: the AGP8X Replacement

10. Beginners Guides: Home Networking and File Sharing

11. Beginners Guides: Installing RAID on a Desktop PC

12. Beginners Guides: Unattended Windows 2000/XP Installations

13. Beginners Guides: 104 Tech Tips for Windows XP

14. Beginners Guides: Wireless Home Networking

15. Beginners Guides: USB Memory Drive Projects

16. Beginners Guides: Making DVD Movies from Video Files

17. Beginners Guides: Formatting and Partitioning a Hard Drive

18. Beginners Guides: WindowsXP Command Prompt

19. Beginners Guide: Slipstreaming a WindowsXP Install CD with Service Pack 2

20. Beginners Guides: Most Common Ways to Kill a PC

  FULL STORY @ PCSTATS

TechwareLabs Article: Building Computers for the Weekend Geek
     Fri, Apr 01 2011 | 4:20P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The face of personal computing is constantly changing and evolving. There are more terms out there than ever before, which makes it harder and harder to keep everything straight. Is the i7 really better than the i5? Why are some computer packages so much cheaper than others? Is that barebones computer for $300 really worth it? What should I really look for when I look at the details of a “PC Bargain”? What does all of that stuff DO anyway?? I’ll try to answer some of those questions, and in such a way that even the Weekend Geek (if there is such a thing) won’t walk away scratching their heads.
  FULL STORY @ TECHWARELABS

Video Frame Rates and Display Refresh Rates for Beginners Guide
     Sun, Mar 20 2011 | 9:00A | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
We hope you've been enjoying our series of Beginner's Guides for HTPC and Home Theater. As part of the series, we’ve previously discussed video resolutions and how video information is displayed on a screen for a frame of video in our guide, Video Resolutions for Beginners. What we didn’t delve into much was the rate at which video frames are captured, or, in other words, the video frame rate. This guide will cover the basics of frame rates and how displays deal with the frame rates. We’ll try to cut through the marketing buzzwords like 120Hz, 240Hz, 600Hz sub-field drive, etc. so that you can make a more informed decision when purchasing your next display and how to insure an optimal viewing experience.
  FULL STORY @ MISSINGREMOTE

Turn an HP SFF Computer Into a Great HTPC
     Sun, Mar 13 2011 | 9:02A | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Face it, most of us like the idea of having an HTPC (Home Theater PC) hooked up to our TV. The flexibility we get with an HTPC over just a DVD player or a gaming console is enough alone to justify the cost. I have built a bunch of these for people and until recently, I have never used pre-built systems. There are many advantages to building a custom machine for your theater, but the biggest disadvantage is the cost. Lately, I have been using Small Form Factor (SFF) HP's and believe it or not... they make great HTPC's.
  FULL STORY @ COMPUTINGONDEMAND

Beginner's Guide to HTPC Software
     Mon, Mar 07 2011 | 1:43P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Each one of these has their pros and cons. If you are using Mac OSX, you don't have many choices beyond Front Row and Plex (below). If you're using Linux, honestly you're probably not reading this guide due to limited options as well--MythTV (below as well). So that leaves Windows users . This is at least 90% of you out there, and most likely what everyone reading this is interested in. Let's take a look at some HTPC software programs and cover some of their pros and cons. By no means is this full in-depth, but should be a good starting point.
  FULL STORY @ MISSINGREMOTE

Three Steps to a Faster Computer/PC
     Mon, Feb 28 2011 | 4:03P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Why is My Computer So Slow? The answer is simple. . . you use it. To be brutally honest a computer requires maintenance just like a car or any other appliance that is used frequently and sometimes more so. If your computer is used by multiple people then this becomes especially true. Programs and garbage accumulate and will eventually slow even the fastest computer down to a crawl. In 90% of PC's the culprit lies with malware and useless programs running behind the scenes. Just because you are not using a program doesn't mean it is not running and taking up valuable CPU time and memory resources.
  FULL STORY @ TECHWARELABS

Beginner's Guide to HTPC: Video Resolutions
     Wed, Feb 09 2011 | 12:01P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Continuing our series of Beginner's Guides for HTPC and Home Theater, this guide will take a closer look at Video Resolutions--what it means, why's it important and how to make your picture as good as possible for your particular environment. In today’s TV market, the choice of resolution is generally between 720p and 1080p with 720p displays offering a lower price. If the display receives a format that is not in its native resolution, the image is scaled to meet the native resolution. There are times when 720p displays are all that is required and this is due to the eye’s ability to resolve each line of resolution from a given distance.
  FULL STORY @ MISSINGREMOTE

 
Crash Recovery & The Blue Screen of Death
     Mon, Feb 07 2011 | 3:23P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
If you've ever used Windows, chances are you've experienced the lovely shade of blue associated with the famous Windows Stop Error or 'Blue Screen of Death.' This frequent, although less so in newer operating systems, error occurs whenever Windows senses a software, hardware or driver error which will not allow it to continue operating properly. In other words, it happens all the time, for all sorts of reasons.

Often, if you're lucky, the problem will resolve itself with a simple reboot and you may never have to worry about it again. More typically though, the BSOD is a harbinger of trouble and you may find yourself faced with another and another until you throw up your hands... but all is not lost.

In this article PCSTATS will walk you through the BSOD in many of its most familiar incarnations.

  FULL STORY @ PCSTATS

Customize the Firefox 4 Interface With These Simple Tweaks
     Wed, Feb 02 2011 | 9:02A | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Firefox 4 is expected to bring one of the most significant stylistic overhauls that the browser has undertaken since the initial transition from the old Mozilla suite. Although the final release is still a few weeks away, we’ve already had a taste of its look and feel thanks to the eight betas pushed out so far. Firefox 4's UI is simplistic and streamlined but it has also drawn criticism for dropping elements like page titles in the title bar or simply for being too “Chrome-like.” Of course Mozilla hasn't deviated from what's made Firefox the second most used browser in the world: flexibility. Here are some quick customization tricks you can use to help you tailor Mozilla’s browser closer to your needs.
  FULL STORY @ TECHSPOT

Guide to HTPC Basics
     Mon, Jan 31 2011 | 3:17P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Continuing our series of Guides for HTPC and Home Theater, this guide offers ten basic tips for getting your HTPC up and running smoothly. Most of these were learned the hard way, hope that sharing means you don't have to...Recording and scanning big TV files for commercials hits a drive really hard. Having at least two physical drives separates the bandwidth necessary to keep the user interface (UI) responsive and minimize the risk for glitches during recording and playback. After adding up all the traffic caused by Media Center recording and ShowAnalyzer reading back and forth in the file while you try to watch it (all potentially multiplied by the number of tuners); then add in a couple “extenders” - you’ll be glad you put the operating system (OS) on one disk and recordings on another.
  FULL STORY @ MISSINGREMOTE

How to Enable Concurrent Sessions in Windows 7 Service Pack 1 RTM
     Mon, Jan 31 2011 | 3:10P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
If you've been following MissingRemote for a while, you know one of our most popular series of guides is Enabling Concurrent Remote Desktop sessions. Continuing that trend we have an updated process below working with the RTM (Official Release to Manufacturing) version of Windows7 Ultimate, Professional, Home Premium and Enterprise Editions, x86 & x64 build 7601, Service Pack Build 1130. For those unaware of what it is, enabling Concurrent Sessions allows you to Remote Desktop into a system that someone else is on, under a different user account, and access the system without kicking the user off. I, for example, use the feature to have MCE running on my Television, and then I remote into my main user account to access all my files without interrupting my MCE session. Special thanks to Mikinho for compiling the package below and making this all possible.
  FULL STORY @ MISSINGREMOTE

3 TB Hard Disk Drive Installation Guide
     Sun, Jan 30 2011 | 12:01P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
When news first leaked about the imminent launch of the Western Digital Caviar Green 3 TB hard disk drive, it got a ton of people really excited. Everyone has been fervently awaiting the arrival of the first desktop hard disk drive to break the 2.1 TB limit that has virtually halted the growth of hard disk drive capacity for last 2 years. Although Seagate was the first to ship a 3 TB hard disk drive in an external drive - the Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Desk, Western Digital would be the first to ship 2.5 and 3 TB internal hard disk drives that anyone can pop into their desktop PCs. However, Western Digital had to rely on a workaround to get the new drives to work with current motherboads, resulting in some limitations...
  FULL STORY @ TECHARP

How to Buy a Desktop PC
     Fri, Jan 28 2011 | 2:32P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
“Does your desktop PC take so long to start up you have time to go get a cup of coffee—and drink it? Tried installing the latest game only to find out your graphics card is six generations too old to play it? Or maybe you just want to take advantage of the speed and reliability of operating systems like Microsoft Windows 7 and Snow Leopard. If any of these are true, then it is time for you to buy a new desktop PC. And we can help you do it.”
  FULL STORY @ BUYING

Windows 7 Tips: Energy Efficiency Report Tool
     Wed, Jan 19 2011 | 9:00A | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Did you know that Windows 7 has tools on board in order to determine energy efficiency problems? This is very simple, we show you how.
  FULL STORY @ TWEAKING

Essential Windows 7 Tweaks
     Tue, Jan 18 2011 | 7:33P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Every person has different tastes when it comes to their installation of Windows. Through the years that have been many things that I do right off the bat when getting my install "just right". In the XP days, the first thing I would do was to stretch the taskbar, enable Quick Launch, add an address bar, unlock it, then move those around a bit. If my taskbar wasn't set up this way, I HATED IT... in fact, I would move other people's around when I worked on their computers! Windows 7 is no different for me, however, the list isn't as exhaustive yet. We covered Part 1 earlier and this is part 2 of a multipart series.
  FULL STORY @ ESSENTIAL

How to Switch from a PC to a Mac
     Tue, Jan 11 2011 | 1:13P | Beginners Guides | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
“They finally wore you down. Your friends' and co-workers' tales of the MacOS –an operating system with such elegance that anyone could master it, so safe that viruses barely exists, and with powers and abilities far beyond those of, well, Windows—have convinced you to switch. You've decided to "think different" and become a Mac user. Here are the things to consider and steps to take as you make a big change to your computing lifestyle.”
  FULL STORY @ MISCELLANEOUS

Beginners Guides NEWS PAGE: of 13    

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Technology Content    
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips and Tweaks for Windows
Beginners Guides: 99 Performance Tips and Tweaks for Windows
Feb 25 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Beginners Guide: Hi-Resolution Panoramic Images with MSFT ICE
Beginners Guide: Hi-Resolution Panoramic Images with MSFT ICE
Jan 27 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Samsung ATIV Book 9-Lite NP915S3G-K01 13.3-inch Touch Screen Notebook Review
Samsung ATIV Book 9-Lite NP915S3G-K01 13.3-inch Touch Screen Notebook Review
Dec 23 | Notebooks
Rating:  
Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex TV HD Media Player Review
Nov 25 | Home Theatre
Rating:  
Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
Beginners Guide: Install/Remove Intel Socket LGA1156 CPU and Heatsink
Nov 18 | Beginners Guides
Rating:  
Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Beginners Guides: Repairing a Cracked / Broken Notebook LCD Screen
Oct 02 | Beginners Guides
Rating:
A broken or cracked LCD screen makes a laptop utterly useless, good thing PCSTATS can show you how to replace that busted laptop screen with a minimum of fuss and for less money than a service center charges. PCSTATS will be fixing a cracked LCD screen on a Lenovo T530 ThinkPad notebook, the general procedures outlined here work for any notebook though.
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 Intel X79 LGA2011 Motherboard In-Depth Review
Jul 27 | Motherboards
Rating:
The Gigabyte GA-X79-UD5 is an awesome 'Sandy Bridge-E' motherboard for anyone in the business of content creation, yet still nimble enough to take on multi-videocard gaming and overclocking at the end of a days work.
MORE » Complete PCSTATS Article and Review Listings...

The best Guides by the best writers on the internet; PCstats Beginners Guides explain computers, software, and all those other wonderful things that cause you frustration.

Learn how to use your computer better, master the internet while protecting yourself, and know what to do when your hard drive kicks the bucket.

  1. 10 Steps to a Secure PC
  2. 101 Tips and Tweaks for Windows XP
  3. 104 Killer Tech Tips for Windows XP
  4. 99 Performance Tips for Windows XP
  5. 99 Windows Vista Performance Tips
  6. Annual PC Checkup Checklist
  7. Assembling Your Own PC
  8. Back up and Restore Data in WinXP
  9. Browser Hijacking and How to Stop it
  10. Building a Home Theatre PC / HTPC
  11. Burning CDs and DVDs
  12. Cloning WindowsXP
  13. Converting Videotape Into Video Files
  14. Crash Recovery: The Blue Screen of Death
  15. Creating a Weblog / Blog
  16. Creating MP3 Music Files
  17. Decrypting Lost Document & Zipped File Passwords
  18. Diagnosing Bad Hard Drives
  19. Diagnosing Bad Memory
  20. Downgrading Windows Vista Back To Windows XP
  21. Dual OS Installation of WindowsXP 32-bit/64-bit
  22. Encryption and Online Privacy
  23. Ergonomics & Computers
  24. Flashing a Video Card BIOS
  25. Flash Memory Data Recovery and Protection
  26. Firewalls and Internet Security
  27. Firewall Setup and Configuration
  28. Forgotten Passwords & Recovery Methods
  29. Formatting and Partitioning a Hard Drive
  30. Fundamentals of Upgrading a PC
  31. Hard Drive Data Recovery
  32. Home Networking and File Sharing
  33. How to Install: Intel Socket 775 CPU and Heatsink
  34. How to Install: Intel Socket 1366 CPU and Heatsink
  35. How to Install: Intel Socket 1155 CPU and Heatsink
  36. How to Install: AMD Socket AM3 CPU and Heatsink
  37. How to Install: AMD Socket FM1 CPU and Heatsink
  38. How to Fix Homesite Design Mode to Work in WindowsXP/ Vista
  39. How To Make a Budget Desktop Computer on the Cheap
  40. How to Update a Motherboard BIOS
  41. Installing RAID on Desktop PCs
  42. Installing Windows Vista
  43. Installing Windows XP
  44. Internet Connection Sharing
  45. Legally Copying Software and Music
  46. Linux Part 1: Getting Familiar
  47. Linux Part 2: Installing a PC
  48. Linux Part 3: New Software
  49. Little Known Features of WindowsXP
  50. Making Old Software Compatible with Windows Vista
  51. Making DVD Movies from Video Files
  52. Most Common Ways to Kill a PC
  53. Optical Drives & Recording Formats
  54. Overclocking the CPU, Motherboard & Memory
  55. Overclocking the Videocard
  56. Preventing Data Theft from a Stolen Laptop
  57. Printer Sharing on a Home Network
  58. Quick Guide for Eliminating Spyware and Hijacker Software
  59. RAM, Memory and Upgrading
  60. Registry: Backups, Repairs, and Protection
  61. Remote Access to Computers
  62. RSS Feed Setup & Subscriptions
  63. Safe Mode in Windows Vista For Crash Recovery
  64. Setting up an FTP Server in WinXP
  65. Slipstreaming WindowsXP with Service Pack 2
  66. Spyware Protection and Removal
  67. Stopping Spam
  68. Stopping Vista From Thrashing Hard Disks to Death
  69. Synchronizing Files and Folders
  70. Unattended Windows 2000/XP Installations
  71. Understanding & Creating Batch Files
  72. Understanding & Tweaking WindowsXP Services
  73. Upgrading A Motherboard Without Reinstalling
  74. Upgrading Win98 to Windows XP
  75. USB Memory Drive Projects & Tips
  76. VPNs and Internet Connection Security
  77. Website Hosting From A Home PC
  78. Website Hosting With Apache
  79. Windows Vista Crash Recovery and Repair Install
  80. Windows XP Command Prompt
  81. Windows XP Safe Mode Explained
  82. Wireless Home Networking
  83. Wireless Network Security
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