PCSTATS Main Page Follow PCSTATS on Facebook PCSTATS RSS Feed PCSTATS Twitter Feed + Motherboards
+ Videocards
+ Memory
+ Beginners Guides
News & Advanced Search  Feedback?
[X]   Directory of
Guides & Reviews
The PCstats Forums

Beginners Guides
Weekly Newsletter
Archived Newsletters

+70 MORE Beginner GUIDES....  

Contact the Suite 66 Advertising Agency
Beginners Guide: How To Install / Remove an Intel Socket LGA2011 CPU

Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO PC4400 DDR Memory Review

Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO PC4400 DDR Memory Review - PCSTATS
Price Check: $/£/€
Abstract: In PCSTATS own tests, we have basically seen that higher memory capacities affect a select few applications.
 82% Rating:   
Filed under: Memory Published:  Author: 
External Mfg. Website: Corsair Oct 11 2005   Colin Sun  
Home > Reviews > Memory > Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO

A total of 1GB of system memory is no longer enough for enthusiastic gamers if we are to believe some recent articles on the web which look specifically at how the game Battlefield 2 handles. Nope, 2GB is the new "1GB," and memory manufacturers are scrambling to make sure their customers know this. Corsair Memory recently published a technical article entitled; "AN506: Performance Impact on Changing Memory Size from 1GByte to 2 GByte" which explored the impact of memory capacity on several applications including Doom3 and Battlefield 2. The results of that white paper show that higher memory capacity is close to reaching the tipping point of where it transitions from a luxury to necessity.

Of the six applications used in Corsairs' AN506 white paper, only two saw significant improvements with 2GB of RAM installed. The remainder saw insignificant changes, and the tests included both AMD and Intel platforms. In PCSTATS own tests, we have basically seen that higher memory capacities affect a select few applications, generally very recent programs or games, quite positively or not at all. Battlefield 2 is the best current example in our benchmark set.

However, faced with building a PC with 1GB or 2GB of installed DDR to start with, the consumer has a couple decisions to make. Though before making that decision, perhaps it is best to first consider the effects of Corsair's new 2GB (2x 1024MB modules) TwinX2048-4400 PRO DDR RAM. Rated to run at speeds of up to 275 MHz, who says you had to sacrifice speed for larger capacity?

Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO

The memory is about 45mm in height, so users with cases where the CDROM overhangs the motherboard had best measure the clearances first. The heatspreaders for Corsair's PRO-series memory also house activity LEDs which are nice to gaze at through a side case window.

Each TwinX2048-4400 PRO memory module is rated for up to 275 MHz with 3-4-4-8 timings at a voltage of 2.8V. If you are more of a low latency guy however, you will be pleased to know that the DIMMs have no problems running tight timings at lower speeds with less voltage.

Overclocking Results:
Memory Timings: 2-2-2-5 3-4-4-8
Memory Speed: 223 MHz

284 MHz


If you're new to Overclocking and not sure what to do, check out these two excellent Guides for some pointers:
Overclocking the CPU and Memory
Overclocking the Videocard

To start the overclocking, I first lowered the CPU multiplier to 6x, this way it will not limit the memory's maximum speed. Starting at 200 MHz and keeping tight 2-2-2-5 memory timings, I slowly increased the motherboard clock speed in 5 MHz intervals.

At 215 MHz the system had difficulty booting into Windows, it would BSOD every time. Increasing the memory voltage from 2.6V to 2.7V solved that issue and benchmarks ran just fine thereafter. I continued to push the motherboard higher and at 225 MHz the TwinX2048-4400 PRO memory again flaked out. The system would not boot and would lock up in the BIOS, so I had to lower the bus speed to 223 MHz and increase the voltage to 2.8V.

A speed of 223 MHz with 2-2-2-5 timings at 2.8V is not bad.... however this memory is intended to run faster with looser timings so that is exactly what we tested next. The memory timings were lowered to 3-4-4-8 (SPD) while 2.8V was maintained. The TwinX2048-4400 PRO had no problems hitting 275 MHz which was pretty sweet. The TwinX2048-4400 PRO memory did not want to go much higher than that though, and the maximum speed it reached was 284 MHz. Anything higher and the system would drop back to desktop while running 3D benchmarks. Raising the voltage higher than 2.8V did not help.

Next up, the benchmarks!

© 2014 PCSTATS.com Next Page >

 

Contents of Article: Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO
 Pg 1.  — Corsair TwinX2048-4400 PRO PC4400 DDR Memory Review
 Pg 2.  PCSTATS Memory Test Methodology and benchmarks
 Pg 3.  Benchmarks: PCMark04. PCMark05
 Pg 4.  Benchmarks: 3DMark2001, 3DMark05
 Pg 5.  Benchmarks: UT2003, UT2004
 Pg 6.  Benchmarks: Doom 3, Battlefield 2
 Pg 7.  Max memory overclocking and Conclusions

SEARCH PCSTATS 
Use the power of Google to search all of PCSTATS and the PCSTATS Forums. Tell us what you think of this new feature - FEEDBACK?
   10 / 20 / 2014 | 5:54PM
Hardware Sections 


google
 
PCSTATS Network Features Information About Us Contact
FrostyTech
TransmetaZone
BeginnersPC
PCSTATS Newsletter
PCSTATS Forums
ShoppingList Assistance
Tech Glossary
Technology WebSite Listings
PermaLink News
Archived News
Submit News (Review RSS Feed)
Site Map
PCstats Wallpaper
About Us
Employment
Privacy Policy
Advertise on PCSTATS

How's Our Driving?
© Copyright 1999-2014 www.pcstats.com All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of Use.