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Azza PT-810DMC i810 Motherboard Review

Azza PT-810DMC i810 Motherboard Review - PCSTATS
Abstract: Taiwan's motherboard manufacturing industry is so tremendous that it can be deemed a cottage industry itself. I can't begin to count the number of manufacturers of mainboards out there...and I won't even try. All across the web you will find reviews for the big name boys such as Asus, ABit, Transcend, Soltek, etc. In this review, you will see the review for a mainboard made by a relatively unknown (well, at least I never heard of it until my father bought this board) company called Azza.
 60% Rating:   
Filed under: Motherboards Published:  Author: 
External Mfg. Website: Azza Apr 12 2000   P. Masrani  
Home > Reviews > Motherboards > Azza PT-810DMC

Azza PT-810DMC i810 Motherboard Review


Taiwan's motherboard manufacturing industry is so tremendous that it can be deemed a cottage industry itself. I can't begin to count the number of manufacturers of mainboards out there...and I won't even try. All across the web you will find reviews for the big name boys such as Asus, ABit, Transcend, Soltek, etc. In this review, you will see the review for a mainboard made by a relatively unknown (well, at least I never heard of it until my father bought this board) company called Azza.

Just to let you know, the only reason this board was purchased was because this is the only board we could locate that is ATA/66 capable. Believe me, the search had gone on for months! This, my friends, is the sad state of affairs for motherboards (and a lot of other things) in India. Lately, it has been improving, but don't think that all is well... Poor me.... ;)

This particular motherboard uses the "Twin-Processor" design. It comes equipped with both the Slot 1 and Socket 370 interfaces. No, you cannot use both at the same time in a dual-processor configuration. This board is basically meant to give lil' ol' Celeron users like myself, the chance to upgrade to a Pentium III when we can afford it. And I really don't see that day coming in the near future. But, no harm in being ready.

Here is a list of the motherboard specifications

Specifications

- Support for either the Pentium III or the Celeron. Speeds up to 800MHz are supported.
- Intel 810 chipset (82810, 82810AA, 82802AB)
- 66, 75, 83 and 100MHz FSB speeds
- 3 DIMM slots for a maximum of 768MB SDRAM.
- 3 PCI slots (no ISA. On-board video, so no AGP slot)
- 1 AMR slot
- ACPI (Microsoft PC99 compliant)
- 2 USB ports
- ATA/66 support through both primary and secondary drive channels
- Onboard audio
- MicroATX form factor
- IR / FIR connector
- AIR Bus connector

Along with the motherboard came the usual user's manual, driver CD and the Slot 1 CPU mounting bracket. Nothing really extraordinary.

Installation

Physical installation was as smooth as installation any other motherboard. The physical layout for the most part was free from any blockage. The only major problem I had found was that the Slot 1 connector resides directly underneath the power supply. This would certainly pose a problem from anyone wanting to add/remove a Slot 1 CPU from the board without having to actually remove the motherboard assembly from the cabinet.

The Socket 370 connector was partially underneath the power supply when looking at it from the top (with the cabinet horizontal), but considering that the depth between the power supply and the Socket 370 connector was sufficient enough to provide for easy installation/removal of a Socket 370 CPU (with fan/heatsink), this really cannot be held as a design fault. After all the CPU (whether in the Slot 1 or Socket 370 connector) is being cooled further through the ATX power supply. This of course, is common with all MicroATX and ATX boards. The DIMM slots were easily accessible. The same goes for the IDE connectors and everything else on the board. Mounting brackets were provided for use with Slot 1 CPUs.

The one problem I did face was the installation of the Ultra DMA drivers. ATA/66 is provided on this motherboard through the Intel 82801AA I/O Controller Hub (keep in mind that ATA/66 is NOT provided on the 82801AB ICH). The Ultra DMA drivers exist in the form of Intel drivers which are the INF file installation procedure. There is a 8 step process is the manual which includes steps for installing the audio drivers and graphic drivers as well.

After I performed the driver installation, I failed to locate an entry of a ULTRA DMA CONTROLLER under the PCI bus System Profile in Windows 98 (Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> System -> Hardware Profiles). After a few minutes, I finally went in and looked at the readme.txt file located in the Intel INF's directory. It turns out that these drivers are only compatible with OEM versions of the Windows 95 and 98 OS. Since I am using a retail upgrade copy, it didn't work. I was forced to download the drivers from the Intel website. The manual provided no mention that these ultra DMA drivers would not work with end-user retail copies of the Windows 9x operating system.

I had sent off an email to the technical support team which failed to provide a proper solution. This, of course, was after I had solved the problem myself. The first email received by me was from a member of tech support instructing me to check the order in which the drivers were installed. This was certainly not the problem. So I sent off another email to them mentioning that the sequence of driver installation was fine. I haven't heard from them since. Now I do not exactly consider this user friendly documentation or sufficient technical support. I was able to figure out the problem on my own. Firstly, I should not have to do any figuring out on my own. Secondly, what will the novice assembler/user do?

© 2017 PCSTATS.com Next Page >

 

Contents of Article: Azza PT-810DMC
 Pg 1.  — Azza PT-810DMC i810 Motherboard Review
 Pg 2.  The Graphics subsystem
 Pg 3.  Test Bed, Graphic Performance
 Pg 4.  Winstone, Overclocking and Other Features
 Pg 5.  Other Features and Conclusion

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