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Kingston HyperX Dual Channel 2133Mhz CL9 Memory Review
     Thu, Jul 28 2011 | 9:02A | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
In this review we will be looking at a slightly different high performance DDR3 memory kit from Kingston called the HyperX KHX2133C9AD3X2K2/4GX. The name may be long but rest assured this is a 2133Mhz DDR3 memory kit with a CAS rating of 9 designed for the Sandy Bridge platform.
  FULL STORY @ NINJALANE

AMD A8-3850, Sapphire A75, G.Skill Flare and 2600MHz+ DDR
     Sat, Jul 23 2011 | 12:03P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"Companies are having some great success with the new A75 platform, achieving RAM speeds of 2400MHz+ DDR, strong overclocks and doing all that fun stuff we've become so used to doing with the AMD platform. I think the biggest surprise about the A75 platform isn't that it just performs so well when you leave the clocks alone, but the fact that it can be overclocked so well and you can have so much fun with it. Hitting memory speeds of 2000MHz+ DDR while possible on the Phenom line up was quite rare, hitting higher was even rarer. Last year we looked at a great kit of RAM from G.Skill. The Flare Kit came with a stock speed of 2000MHz DDR and a timing setup of 7-9-7-24 @ 1.65v. The worst thing about the kit was that its compatibility list for motherboards was a little small and we ended up getting to only 2127MHz DDR. This was the best kit of RAM for the AMD platform, though. The issue is that you could only get so much out of the kit, not because of the speed it offered, but because of the AMD platform."
  FULL STORY @ TWEAKTOWN

DataTraveler Ultimate 3.0 G2
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 4:00P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"The first version of Kingston DataTraveler 3.0 was announced on Sep 2011 with rated read/write speeds at 80/60MBps and eight months later Kingston DataTraveler 3.0 G2 was officially announced with greater performance; 100/70MBps. The improvement is mainly due to the new native controller chip on Kingston DataTraveler 3.0 G2 which boosts up the performance about 15 - 35%."
  FULL STORY @ HARDWAREBISTRO

Corsair Announces Limited Edition 1.5V 8GB Dominator
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 12:01P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
— Corsair®, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced availability in limited quantities of a new 1.5V 8GB Dominator® GT DDR3 memory kit with an aggressive timing specification. The new 8GB dual-channel DDR3 kit is guaranteed to operate at 2133MHz at a memory voltage of 1.5V, and with a groundbreaking timing specification of CL9-11-9. With latency settings this low, the Dominator GT modules have the most aggressive timing specification of any 2x4GB 21333MHz 1.5V memory kit available today. The new hand-assembled Dominator GT memory kit is the product of a multi-stage component screening process in which individual memory ICs are screened before assembly onto the PCBs, which then undergo additional rigorous testing to ensure reliable performance. Qualification is performed on Intel® P67 and P55 motherboards, using the same rigorous test cycle applied to the rest of Corsair's memory product lines. As with all Corsair memory products, Dominator GT is backed by a limited lifetime warranty. "The unprecedented timing specification on the 1.5V Dominator GT kit makes it ideal for overclocking," said Giovanni Sena, Director of Memory Products at Corsair. "Dominator GT memory is designed for enthusiasts who are obsessed with pushing their PC's performance to the limit, and this latest kit is a worthy addition to the family." The 1.5V 8GB Dominator GT (CMT8GX3M2A2133C9) DDR3 memory kit comes complete with Corsair's patented DHX+ heatsinks and an AirFlow 2 GTL Cooling Fan for exceptional thermal performance. It may be purchased directly from Corsair.com for $499 USD. Limited quantities are available. For more information on this and other Corsair Dominator memory products, please visit the Corsair web site. About DHX+ Technology Corsair's patented DHX+ technology uses specially designed, high-quality heatsinks and a custom-designed PCB that allows both the front and rear of the memory ICs, and the printed circuit board itself, to be cooled. DHX+ technology also allows for the cooling fins to be removed, allowing for a range of modular cooling accessories including extended heatsink fins and the AirFlow Pro™ dynamic temperature and activity display. DHX and DHX+ designs are covered by US Patent number 7,606,034.
  FULL STORY @ CORSAIR

G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-8GBSQ 2x4GB DDR3 Laptop
     Fri, Jul 22 2011 | 9:02A | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
If you have been paying attention to the computer industry, you will know DRAM pricing goes up and down like... well, DRAM pricing. Okay, a better comparison is probably like gas prices. While I am not any credible oil market expert by a long shot, sometimes you can't just help it to wonder things like, why is the pump price exactly the same when oil is less than $100 a barrel and $150 a barrel? Why does the local gas station's numbers goes up overnight when there is a hurricane off some random place no one has ever heard of, but for some reason it never goes back down when Middle East countries increases oil production the next day? And the list goes on and on. DRAM pricing is pretty much like the same thing, except the good news for us is, it goes down rather than up most of the time. For example, when we reviewed the G.SKILL F3-8500CL7D-8GBSQ 2x4GB SODIMM kit back in December 2009, the price tag hovered around a hefty $400 at most online retailers. A year and a half later, the same kit sells for less than sixty bucks. With that in mind, let's move straight into our review today. What we have here at APH Networks is the G.SKILL F3-10666CL9D-8GBSQ 2x4GB dual channel set, which is pretty much the same thing as the model represented by the long string of digits and letters I have just mentioned, except it operates at DDR3-1333 rather than DDR3-1066. Knowing DDR3-1333 is now the standard memory speed for all second generation Intel Core mobile processors, for an extra five bucks at press time, is this really the kit to get? We installed a set into our brand new, Sandy Bridge based Lenovo ThinkPad T420 laptop to find out.
  FULL STORY @ APHNETWORKS

G.SKILL RipjawsX F3-14900CL9Q-8GBXL Kit Review – Leading The Charge
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 4:02P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The memory market has seen a lot of fluctuation and change in the past year. RAM timings have gotten lower, performance has gotten better, and prices have submarined to a point where consumers can easily afford to fill their entire DIMM slots. Because of these market conditions, many memory manufacturers have slowed down their production, offerings, and some have even closed shop. After the dust has settled, the Taiwanese G.SKILL Team remains standing and, by the looks of the plethora of offerings in their DDR3 line-up, it is clear that they are in it for the long-haul.
  FULL STORY @ THESSDREVIEW

Patriot Supersonic Magnum 64GB USB 3.0 Flash
     Thu, Jul 21 2011 | 9:02A | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
'Appearance versus reality' is one of my favorite things to write about when I studied English Language Arts IB back in high school. Unlike most topics people like to study in literature, this actually applies to our daily lives just as much as what we are about to have for lunch this afternoon. Whether it be the Hyundai girl I have talked about in my ASUS P8H67-I Deluxe review, or the "change is certain, progress is not" attitude discussed in my Intel Core i3-2120 article last month, it is surprising how much we can all relate to it. Just last night, after eating out with a friend here in Toronto, he drove me home because I don't have my car with me at the time. As we walked out into the parking lot, I was excited to see him point at the shiny new Graphite Luster Metallic Acura TSX in front. "Nice car", I thought to myself. Unfortunately, what he actually meant was the dull little Hyundai Elantra parked behind it. It is unfortunate to say sometimes in life, things are just not as good as we perceive them to be. On the other hand, the ambitiously named OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS 240GB I have reviewed last week seems to be quite the opposite. Carrying a name that expresses no attempt at being modest, we later found out this is only a part of the story -- its performance is simply matchless and beyond imagination. That's nice to hear. But how about yet another ambitiously named product, the Patriot Supersonic Magnum 64GB? With a capacity in the area of 'ridiculous', and promises to deliver up to 200MB/s read and 120MB/s write over USB 3.0 in conjunction with its 8-channel technology, is this what Jeremy Clarkson would refer to as the fastest USB flash drive... in the world? We have it thoroughly tested in our eight-page review today.
  FULL STORY @ SUPERSONIC

 
Patriot Supersonic 32 GB USB 3.0
     Wed, Jul 20 2011 | 4:45P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Patriot has also jumped on the USB 3.0 bandwagon with their Supersonic series of drives. While the Supersonic Magnum is the flagship drive, the normal Supersonic packs quite the punch and breaks the advertised performance barrier - giving you more than you bargained for.
  FULL STORY @ PATRIOT

Patriot Gamer 2 AMD Edition PC3-12800 8GB Kit Review
     Fri, Jul 15 2011 | 4:05P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"AMD systems are a little picky when it comes to RAM. Sure, most RAM will work, but quite often when we start to hit high speed kits they can have problems running at stock speed on an AMD platform. With the launch of the new 990FX chipset that's ready for Bulldozer along with the new Llano platform which has shown strong memory performance, it was only a matter of time 'till we saw some AMD specific kits." The first in a long while comes from Patriot and is part of the Gamer 2 series with the particular kit we're dealing with being labelled "AMD Edition", which of course means it's designed for AMD systems. Coming in at 1600MHz DDR, the PC3-12800 8GB kit carrying a 9-9-9-24 @ 1.65v - 1.7v isn't a really high speed kit. It is of course an 8GB kit, though, which does tend to impact the speed we have. Combined with the fact it's an AMD one as well, we see that the speed can be limited a little more again. Still, hopefully we'll see some overclocking potential from the kit."
  FULL STORY @ TWEAKTOWN

Crucial Ballistix 6GB DDR3 2133 MHz RAM Triple Channel Kit Review @ TechwareLabs
     Tue, Jul 12 2011 | 5:30P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
The price of DDR3 has fallen rapidly lately, making it much more affordable to populate all of your RAM slots. Crucial introduces their new DDR3 2133 MHz Ballistix RAM in a triple channel kit. Find out if you should be using this with your i7."
  FULL STORY @ TECHWARELABS.COM

GeIL Enhance CORSA 1600MHz CL9 8GB DDR3 Review @ Vortez
     Tue, Jul 12 2011 | 5:30P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Today we will be taking a look at another DDR3 kit from the CORSA series, this time the Enhance. More specifically a dual channel kit rated at 1600MHz with the CAS timings of 9-9-9-28 @ 1.5v. The EVO CORSA kit we recently tested pushed the boundaries in terms of performance at stock against very competitive pricing; can the Enhance kit we are looking at today follow in the same manner? Let`s find out!"
  FULL STORY @ VORTEZ.NET

Understanding RAM Timings
     Tue, Jul 12 2011 | 4:03P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
"DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 memories are classified according to the maximum speed at which they can work, as well as their timings. Timings are numbers such as 3-4-4-8, 5-5-5-15, 7-7-7-21, or 9-9-9-24, the lower the better. In this tutorial, we will explain exactly what each one of these numbers mean."
  FULL STORY @ HARDWARESECRETS

G.Skill RipjawsZ PC3-17000 16GB Kit Review
     Tue, Jul 12 2011 | 11:19A | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Today we`ll be looking at the F3-17000CL9Q-16GBZHD kit which is of course a PC3-17000 kit as the name would suggest. Of course, supporting the new Sandy Bridge-E platform, the first thing we notice is that the kit consists of four modules so they can be ran in Quad Channel on our ASUS Rampage IV Extreme today. Moving in closer to the modules, we can get a better idea of what exactly is going on with the speed and the timings of the kit. Of course, we know that PC3-17000 translates to 2133MHz DDR and this is probably going to be one of the more popular numbers for the new quad channel kits with 2133MHz DDR hitting that performance point we love to see without carrying with it 2400MHz DDR prices."
  FULL STORY @ TWEAKTOWN.COM

BIOS Option Of The Week - SDRAM CAS Latency
     Mon, Jul 11 2011 | 12:02P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Since 1999, we have been developing the BIOS Optimization Guide, affectionately known as the BOG. From a meager beginning of a single page, it now covers over 440 BIOS options. As old BOG readers will know, we started offering two editions of the BOG since Revision 8.0 - a simplified edition and the complete edition. Normally, the complete edition is only available to subscribers who help sponsor the development of the guide through a small fee. However, that changes today! From now on, we will post a BIOS option from the complete edition of the BIOS Optimization Guide every weekend.
  FULL STORY @ TECHARP

Kingston’s HyperX Plug and Play (PnP) 8GB DDR3 SODIMM 1866MHz
     Sat, Jul 09 2011 | 4:01P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Our latest video review brings us face to face with a product that claims both a performance increase and ease of installation. We’ve heard both claims on many late night infomercials. However, this is one product that is no snake oil and as you see in the video above, Kingston’s new HyperX Plug and Play (PnP) 8GB DDR3 1866MHz Dual Channel SODIMM memory kit really does deliver on both promises. It definitely turned us from educated skeptics into believers, especially when it came to the benchmarks that don’t lie! Hit that play button!
  FULL STORY @ FUTURELOOKS

Patriot Memory Flash Drive Shootout – USB 2.0 vs. USB 3.0 Quad Channel vs. USB 3
     Sun, Jul 03 2011 | 12:01P | Memory | PermaLink
Posted by: STAFF
Not all USB flash drives are made alike. There are reasons why you can find el cheapo knockoff brand drives in the bargain bin, as well as seemingly similar flash drives for much more money. And this goes well beyond just having more storage. And that’s where we find ourselves today. In this USB flash drive shootout, we take a look at the difference between USB 2.0 and USB 3.0, as well as the difference between having quad-channel and 8-channel. To help minimize other variables, we’ve stuck with just one brand: Patriot Memory.
  FULL STORY @ FUTURELOOKS

Memory NEWS PAGE: of 68    

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